June 2009: Inverse Order, J Williams, Katchafire, Kids of 88, Kidz In Space, Kirsten Morrell

Water and electricity, midnight dance-off, going back to Cali, gang fight, pixels and chaos, and bored office workers.

Continue reading June 2009: Inverse Order, J Williams, Katchafire, Kids of 88, Kidz In Space, Kirsten Morrell

February 2008: Katchafire, Mareko, Opshop, Salmonella Dub, Spacifix

A celebration of the glorious proletariat, work-related travel expenses, subterranean homesick New Zealander, nature porn, and cramped working conditions.
Continue reading February 2008: Katchafire, Mareko, Opshop, Salmonella Dub, Spacifix

October 2007: Ill Semantics, Jackie Bristow, Katchafire, Kora, Luke Thompson

The world famous love machine, winding up, a front porch strum, sci-fi heroes, and chilling in Raggiz.
Continue reading October 2007: Ill Semantics, Jackie Bristow, Katchafire, Kora, Luke Thompson

February 2007: Gasoline Cowboy, Haylee Fisher, Inverse Order, Katchafire, Madam Parker, Odessa

Katchafire say aloha, space Cowboys, over accessorising, penthouse luxury, pyro dummies, and paper dolls.
Continue reading February 2007: Gasoline Cowboy, Haylee Fisher, Inverse Order, Katchafire, Madam Parker, Odessa

June 2006: Goodnight Nurse, Greg Johnson, Hinewehi Mohi & Joel Haines, Ill Semantics, Katchafire

’06 Bonnie and Clyde, Greg’s Americana, angry graffiti, and the children (who are the future).
Continue reading June 2006: Goodnight Nurse, Greg Johnson, Hinewehi Mohi & Joel Haines, Ill Semantics, Katchafire

April 2006: Juse, Katchafire, Lemuel, Luke Buda, Luke Thompson

A really unflattering pink jumper, a rool-trippy-as road trip, a fairly straight road trip, and so much wood panelling.
Continue reading April 2006: Juse, Katchafire, Lemuel, Luke Buda, Luke Thompson

Katchafire “Close Your Eyes”

2005-katchafire-close-your-eyesThe default Katchafire video has the band performing at a live venue, surrounded by fans, friends and whanau, with everyone having a great time. “Close Your Eyes” is one of those videos.

The band are found playing at the Junction Bar in Frankton, their local. The video follows them from setting up to performing. And everyone in the bar, from little kids to oldies, are all grooving to the band and having a good time. (Diabolical thought: wouldn’t it be amazing if a music video showed a real audience looking bored and talking during the band?)

The video is cut with still photos of the same event. The photos are a better quality than the video. And because the photographer has ventured out onto the streets of Frankton (the most interesting part of Hamilton), the photos tend to be more interesting than the video. Smiling kids playing in the fountain, biker dudes posing across from the iconic Forlong’s furniture shop and a boy enjoying a massive battered sausage – so Frankton.

It’s a really low-key video, but it’s Katchafire doing what they do best.

Best bit: the hongi – this is not America.

Nga Taonga Sound & Vision

Next… a lot of balls.

Katchafire “Rude Girl”

2004-katchafire-rude-girlKatchafire’s sauciest song opens with the titular rude girl leaving her inner-city apartment (or office?) and taking a shortcut through a Chinese restaurant downstairs to an alleyway out the back of a building, where a taxi awaits. None of these locations are faked – there is indeed a Chinese restaurant on Wyndham Street that leads through to Durham Lane. Though it would have been whole lot easier if she’d got the taxi to come around to the front entrance.

The taxi takes a surreal journey through a warehouse, lit in neon, with various members of Katchafire doing unusual things. It’s like a Levi’s ad from the ’90s. Rude girl isn’t bothered. She’s probably seen it all before.

The taxi takes her to Katchafire playing at a makeshift bar in the middle of an otherwise empty warehouse. Partying ensures. The next morning the rude girl gets into the taxi. NZ On Screen notes that “its kooky hydraulic suspension is utilized to rude effect”, which is a polite way of saying that it implies that the taxi is getting an erection, as taxis do.

The video does all look really stylish, and the whole experience has a dreamlike feel. It’s something that Katchafire’s previous videos have never managed, despite it really suiting the laidback style of their music. The video was rated #83 in the Film Archive’s poll of the top 100 New Zealand music videos.

Best bit: the car with an “APPLAUSE” sign where a “TAXI” sign would normally be.

Director: Ivan Slavov
Nga Taonga Sound & Vision

Next… please, Mr Postman.

Katchafire “Seriously”

2004-katchafire-seriouslyA lot of Katchafire’s previous videos have involved the band playing at some sort of concert, but this video goes a step further and is a recording of an actual live performance.

It all looks like a pretty standard Katchafire show, with no rockstar (reggaestar?) antics wheeled out for the camera. And it’s so good to see a real audience in a performance music video. The enthusiastic crowd dance and cheer, seemingly of their own accord.

The song takes a while to get going. In this live version, the bass doesn’t kick in until almost two minutes into the song. Before that happens, the build-up feels like one big tease of EDM proportions.

Strangely enough, throughout the performance we can hear the constant chatter of the crowd. Is this normal at a Katchafire concert? Because it seems to me if you’re talking loud enough to be heard over the music, then you’re probably not really paying all that much attention to the music.

It ends up being a fairly ordinary documentary of Katchafire playing a live show in 2004. Maybe that’s the problem. To be in the crowd, dancing along with your friends with your favourite band would be a great experience. But somehow these emotions don’t translate so well to the screen.

Best bit: the positioning of the NZ On Air logo at the end of a beam of light.

Director: Ivan Slavov

Next… tuning in.